Musings

Awardless valedictorian

http://news.abs-cbn.com/life/07/14/18/sakto-lang-lanyards-not-medals-for-ust-grad-in-viral-tweet

πŸ’˜πŸ’˜πŸ’˜ This article shot right through my heart, for I know what that student feels, and I was compelled to share. Hahah πŸ˜…

One step into UST campus as a high school freshman way back in 2003, I already realized I’m no match with my classmates. Though I know deep inside that I can do better than what I usually show, my insecurities would always eat me and what I’ll settle with is a passing score. Past forward to 2007, even I was shocked for I graduated maintaining my standing in the first section (sophomore to senior years).

When I went into college, my insecurities gradually healed, but I was still in love with mediocrity. No one pressured me, anyway, and I was still believing that I don’t deserve an award from a prestigious university like UST (I don’t believe in myself, period). Realization just came knocking a month shy from my college graduation. I found out my GWA was just few points short to obtain a Cum laude citation. But I was not devastated, I was not even sad. I just remembered a particular day in the summer of 2009; it puzzled me upon seeing my grades for I received a 2.75 grade in Church & Sacraments course, but I was expecting 1.00 or 1.25 (my professor even exempted me from taking the finals because my Church Involvement project was ‘exceptional’). Instead of talking to my professor, I went home and shrugged it off, feeling blessed that another sem had ended.

I’m not really sure that if I had made that correction in the grade, I would be included in the list of Cum laude. But I really did (and still do) not care. What I realized in my graduation day is that if I robbed myself of the confidence it deserves, I now couldn’t do that to my profession. I geared up and promised that I would serve my job in the best of my ability, and thank God, he helped me through it. Seven years later, I am now in the profession of helping the young to discover their potential, to empower them so they can work hard for their future, and to achieve the success they undoubtedly deserve. And that is the biggest award I can ever get in my lifetime. That is the kind of character that UST has instilled me for the 8 years it sheltered and molded me. And I will always be proud of that.

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